One day, our cavities may be filled in a way that's more permanent and less involved with the dentist's drill.  The two-step process, spurred by researchers at Kings College London, involves an electric current that spurs decayed teeth to repair themselves.  Professor Nigel Pitts says, "The way we treat teeth today is not ideal.

When we repair a tooth by putting in a filling, that tooth enters a cycle of drilling and refilling as, ultimately, each 'repair' fails."  Dr Pitts adds, "Not only is our device kinder to the patient and better for their teeth, but it's expected to be at least as cost-effective as current dental treatments."

The method first prepares the damaged part of the enamel outer layer of the tooth, then uses a tiny electric current to draw calcium and phosphate in.  According to London's Independent newspaper, the method first prepares the damaged part of the enamel outer layer of the tooth, then uses a tiny electric current to draw calcium and phosphate in.  The technique, known as Electrically Accelerated and Enhanced Remineralisation (EAER), could be available within three years.