Hannah's Headlines- 2/16/2018

posted by Hannah - 

Couple Wins $1M Lottery After Losing Everything In Fire

Things are looking up for a couple in Canada who lost their home and all their belongings in a wildfire two years ago. Bill Pendergast and his wife just won a million-dollars in the Canadian Lottery and now they look forward to rebuilding their lives.

Pendergast was visiting his father in Newfoundland and went to the store to get him a soda and picked up the lottery ticket on a whim. The next morning he was shocked to find he was a new millionaire.

The couple says they’ll spend most of the money to “help put the pieces back together,” which includes finishing construction on their new house and taking a family vacation with their five sons. And Bill says there’s one other thing he’d like to get, “I have always wanted a Mustang, and I will finally have one, I’m 100% sure of that.”

Source: Action News Jax


NATIONAL CAREGIVERS DAY – NATIONAL DO A GROUCH A FAVOR DAY – NATIONAL ALMOND DAY – NATIONAL TARTAR SAUCE DAY


“Plogging” Is The Swedish Fitness Craze That’s Good For The Planet

There’s a new fitness craze making its way across social media: “plogging.” It comes from Sweden and it’s jogging with a twist. The name is a combination of the word “jogging” and the Swedish phrase “plocka upp” which means “pick up.” And all you do is go for a jog and pick up litter along the way, so it’s good for you, and the environment, too.

While out jogging in a park or on a neighborhood trail, instead of zoning out on a running playlist or focusing only on pace, ploggers stop to grab a plastic bottle or can when they see one. So while they’re working up a sweat with the jog, they get the added benefit of intermittent squats. Swedish health app Lifesum estimates the average user burns 288 calories for every 30 minutes spent plogging, which is about the same amount you burn running.

The mental distraction may make your jog more fun, since you’ll be so busy looking for litter that you won’t realize you’ve already clocked a 5K. Plus, you’ll not only feel good about getting your sweat sesh in, you get the added bonus of knowing you’re leaving the world in a better place by collecting trash and recycling. It’s good for your body, your conscious, and your community and what could be better than that?

Source: Shape


How to Train Your Brain to Forget Your Ex

Studies have shown that a romantic breakup can feel just as bad as a physical injury, and be just as hard to get over as an addiction, says Guy Winch, author of the new book “How to Fix a Broken Heart” (Simon & Schuster). Here, Winch, a therapist with a practice in the Flatiron District, shares his tips for getting over someone.

Remember the bad times

Keep a list of bad memories handy for when the happy ones pop up. “For every smile, remember a frown,” Winch says. “You have to insert forcefully the balanced picture.”

Go on a ‘reminder purge’

About a month or so after the breakup, start allowing yourself to go to the places that might remind you of your ex. Make new associations with them; take a good friend to your favorite date spots. “Every time you say, ‘No, I’m not going there,’ you’re reinforcing that association and giving more power to the heartbreak in that sense,” he says.

Meditate

Sit in a peaceful place and focus on your breath. If unpleasant thoughts about your ex enter your mind, acknowledge them, and then refocus on your breath. “You’re training your mind to be less emotionally reactive,” Winch says.

Don’t overthink it

Even if you’re not clear why someone dumped you, closure will come much faster if you’re not creating conspiracies about the reasons why. “You have to be able to say to yourself repeatedly, ‘It doesn’t matter, we’re broken up,’” he says. By doing so, you “assert control over [your] recovery.”

Link: https://nypost.com/2018/02/14/how-to-train-your-brain-to-forget-your-ex/


Are You A Loud Chewer? It’s Making Other People Dumb

Sound sensitivity to people eating or coughing affects learning, a new study published in the journal “Applied Cognitive Psychology” found. The findings indicate that people who revealed they were sensitive to these types of sounds — even if they didn’t have clinical misophonia (sound sensitivity syndrome) — had a much harder time mastering and retaining information when they could hear a person chewing. This suggests that sound sensitivity has an impact on academic performance.

  • Is loud chewing one of the most disgusting habits someone can have?
  • Is a loud chewer a dating deal breaker for you?

Link: https://nypost.com/2018/02/14/this-habit-is-so-gross-it-makes

Hannah

Hannah

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