Hannah's Headlines - 4/2/2019

April 2, 2019 – NATIONAL PEANUT BUTTER AND JELLY DAY – SAAM DAY OF ACTION – NATIONAL RECONCILIATION DAY – NATIONAL EQUAL PAY DAY – NATIONAL FERRET DAY

Do or Did You Feel Like Getting Married Will Finally Make You Happy?

Whether you never want to get married or you’re afraid you’ll never find someone to say “I do” to in the first place, here’s some good news: science has proven once and for all that tying the knot won’t really add anything to your life, so you can stop stressing about it either way. According to an award-winning German study of over 24,000 people, the first year of marriage allows couples a second go at the honeymoon period. Life is grand and your happiness levels might skyrocket but it’s a totally temporary effect. According to another 17-year, 5-wave panel study, there was no time in a marriage when either spouse actually ever got happier as a result of their relationship. And yet another study added that while marriage has plenty of benefits like companionship, emotional support, and sexual intimacy, those things tend to wane over time, thereby negating their positive effects.

  • Are you divorced because you thought marriage was going to make you happy and it didn’t?

Link:https://www.bolde.com/science-proves-once-for-all-that

Study finds dubstep is good for something: mosquito repellant

A genre of music many humans find repellent is apparently also repulsive to mosquitoes: dubstep.

In theirstudy, published in the scientific journalArcta Tropica, an international team of researchers studied the effects ofSkrillex's dubstep track "Scary Monsters And Nice Sprites" on a certain species of mosquito.

Long story short: The bloodsucker, linked to tropical regions where it spreads diseases like Zika, yellow fever and dengue fever, didn't dig it, according to the study. 

More specifically, the track, which mixes high and low frequency sounds, made the insects less interested in biting and reproducing.

"In insects, low-frequency vibrations facilitate sexual interactions, whereas noise disrupts the perception of signals from [potential mates]," as well as their biting targets, the study said.

"The observation that such music can delay host attack, reduce blood feeding, and disrupt mating provides new avenues for the development of music-based personal protective and control measures against Aedes-borne diseases," the researchers concluded.

The side effect, of course, is that humans that are being protected are also going to have to be exposed to dubstep.

Men Board Flight With Emotional Support Falcons

We often see people traveling with their pets these days and they simply call them their emotional support animals. We've also heard of folks trying to bring on some pretty crazy animals. However, this isn't as uncommon as one might think. 

Passengers on a Qatar Airlines flight saw two men carrying three falcons on board with them. The expensive birds are not likely "emotional support falcons," as posted on Twitter. The tweet of the men went viral and amassed over 2 million views and hundreds of supportive comments. 

Turns out that traveling with Falcons is a common practice around the world and that they are most certainly not considered emotional support animals. Though permitted, bringing a falcon on a flight will cost you. According to Qatar Airlines, traveling with your falcon on board can run up to $630.

Grandma Has Baby At 61 For Son And His Husband

There are all kinds of ways to become a family, but littleUma Louise Dougherty-Eledgehas a truly unique story of how she came into this world. The baby girl was born to delighted dadsMatthew EledgeandElliot Doughertyafter being conceived via in vitro fertilization. They used Eledge’s swimmers and eggs from Dougherty’s sister. But the person who carried that baby around and grew her in her belly for nine months was actually baby Uma’sgrandmother.

Yup - Eledge’s 61-year-old motherCecile Reynek Eledgeserved as the gestational carrier, helping her son and his hubs to become first-time parents. The proud papa says other people had offered to be a surrogate for them and carry their baby, but in the end, it never worked out. So that’s when they found their one-of-a-kind way to create their family.

"I had a lot of people in college say they would (carry and deliver a child), but when push comes to shove, that's a huge commitment," Eledge explains. The couple felt other options were “too corporate” for them, like they were buying something. Now he says, “More than anything, we feel lucky to have women selfless enough to do this.”

Source:Yahoo

You Could Meet The Love Of Your Life On A Flight

Recently, 5,000 travelers from around the world were asked whether or not they have ever made a love connection on a flight. A staggering 1 in 50 people have not only made a romantic connection with a stranger on a flight, but say that they actually found the love of their life on an airplane. And Americans in particular are finding love in the air, with two U.S. couples meeting on every flight!

Other social connections that were made during travel include:

  • 16% of travelers formed business connections on a flight
  • 14% made a long-lasting friendship connection on a flight
  • 51% have struck up a conversation with a stranger on a fight

If you’re looking to meet your Romeo or Juliet on your next trip, there are some apps and sites to help with that. Check out thebtrflyapp which connects travelers at over 380 worldwide airports by inputting your flight info. WebsitePlanelyis a social media platform that lets you connect with fellow travelers who have the same intrests.

Source:Travel+Leisure

Hannah

Hannah

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